Comprehensive Eye Exams


Dr. Kaplan and Dr. Contento use a wide variety of tests and procedures to examine your eyes. These tests range from simple ones, like having you read an eye chart, to complex tests, such as using a high-powered lens to visualize the tiny structures inside of your eyes. A comprehensive eye exam can take an hour or more, depending on the doctor and the number and complexity of tests required to fully evaluate your vision and the health of your eyes.

 

Here are eye and vision tests that you are likely to encounter during a routine comprehensive eye exam:

  • - Visual Acuity Test
  • - Color Blindness Test
  • - Cover Test
  • - Retinoscopy
  • - Refraction
  • - Slit-Lamp Examination
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    Contact Lens Exams/Fittings

     


     

    Dry Eye



    Sometimes people don't produce enough tears or the right quality of tears to keep their eyes healthy and comfortable. This condition is known as dry eye.

     

    The eye uses two different methods to produce tears. It can make tears at a slow, steady rate to maintain normal eye lubrication. It can also produce a lot of tears in response to eye irritation or emotion. When a foreign body or dryness irritates the eye, or when a person cries, excessive tearing occurs.

     


     

    Cataracts



    Cataracts are one of the most common causes of vision loss, especially as we age, they are treatable with cataract surgery. Since most cataracts are part of the normal aging process, they cannot be reversed. There are no medications or eye drops that will make cataracts go away—surgery is the only treatment.

     

    If your vision has become blurry, cloudy or dim, or things you see are not as bright or colorful as they used to be, a cataract may have developed in one or both of your eyes. Many people say that their vision with cataracts is similar to the effect of looking through a dirty car windshield.

     

    When a cataract causes bothersome vision problems that interfere with your daily activities, your ophthalmologist may recommend surgery to remove the cataract. With cataract surgery, your eye's cloudy natural lens is removed and replaced with a clear artificial lens implant (called an intraocular lens or IOL).

     


     

    Glaucoma



    Glaucoma is a disease that damages your eye's optic nerve. It usually happens when fluid builds up in the front part of your eye. That extra fluid increases the pressure in your eye, damaging the optic nerve.

     

    In the healthy eye, a clear fluid called aqueous (pronounced AY-kwee-us) humor circulates inside the front portion of your eye. To maintain a constant healthy eye pressure, your eye continually produces a small amount of aqueous humor while an equal amount of this fluid flows out of your eye. If you have glaucoma, the aqueous humor does not flow out of the eye properly. Fluid pressure in the eye builds up and, over time, causes damage to the optic nerve fibers.

     


     

    Macular Degeneration



    About 1.75 million U.S. residents currently have advanced age-related macular degeneration with associated vision loss, with that number expected to grow to almost 3 million by 2020.

     

    Age-related macular degeneration, often called AMD or ARMD, is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness among Americans who are age 65 and older. Because people in this group are an increasingly larger percentage of the general population, vision loss from macular degeneration is a growing problem.

     


     

    Keratoconus



    The exact cause of keratoconus is unknown. There are many theories based on research and its association with other conditions.However, no one theory explains it all and it may be caused by a combination of things. It is believed that genetics, the environment and the endocrine system all play a role in keratoconus.

     

    Often, keratoconic patients experience changes in their eyeglass prescription every time they visit their eye care practitioner.

     


     

    Laser Vision Co-Management



    LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) is an outpatient refractive surgery procedure used to treat nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. A laser is used to reshape the cornea — the clear, round dome at the front of the eye — to improve the way the eye focuses light rays onto the retina at the back of the eye.




The Human Eye


  • Heidelberg Spectrails OCT

  • Humphrey Visual Field

  • Oculas keratograph 5M

  • B-Scan Ultrasound

  • Topcon retinal digital photography